November 5

Fall Feasts

This Thanksgiving, let these SLU businesses take care of the turkey.

Feeling a bit hesitant this year about spending hours in the kitchen as you calculate cooking times and navigate precious oven space? End the wet versus dry brine debate and leave your Thanksgiving meal up to the professionals.

Lean on these four neighborhood businesses this year to help remove some of the pressure that can come with hosting a big fall feast or intimate family dinner.

Whole Foods Market

The Westlake location of Whole Foods Market certainly has everything you need for the perfect home-cooked Thanksgiving dinner. But did you know you can pick up a ready-made meal with all the sides and dessert here? Variety is key—this location has more than a dozen meal options. Aside from the typical whole turkey meal (with green beans with roasted shallots, creamy mashed potatoes, traditional herb stuffing, turkey gravy, and cranberry orange sauce), Whole Foods has beef wellington, prime rib, and a Paleo option on offer.

Vegans, rejoice—chef and cookbook author Chloe Coscarelli used new techniques to transform the classics into a special menu exclusively for Whole Foods Markets. It includes cremini mushroom roast, miso creamed greens, jalapeño cornbread dressing, mushroom gravy, pumpkin curry soup, and coconut sweet potato casserole.

Note: Orders must be made a minimum of 24 hours ahead of pickup date and time for Holiday Selections and 48 hours for Everyday Selections. 2210 Westlake Ave., wholefoodsmarket.com/stores/westlake

Thanksgiving dinner spread of selected vegan dishes.

Bucca di Beppo

This family favorite carves out space on its epic Italian menu every fall for its thanksgiving feast. Each meal comes with sliced white meat turkey, homestyle gravy, roasted garlic mashed potatoes, spicy Italian sausage stuffing, green beans, cranberry sauce, and pumpkin pie. You can order your meal cold so you can heat it and eat it on your own timeline or get it hot and serve it immediately. Preorders are due by 8am on November 23. 701 Westlake Ave. N., locations.bucadibeppo.com/us/wa/seattle

Sea Creatures/Willmott’s Ghost

Chef Renee Erickson’s Sea Creatures, the umbrella name for her family of restaurants that include Willmott’s Ghost and Deep Dive in SLU, is once again orchestrating an exciting Thanksgiving dinner for you to take home. The meal includes salt-brined turkey, a salad of

chicories, pecans, kumquats, and shallot sherry vinaigrette, brussels sprouts with lemon olive oil and walnut garlic crumb, buttery mashed potatoes, Bateau beef gravy,

orange cranberry sauce, herbed sourdough stuffing, and house made dinner rolls. This dinner, which serves 8-10, takes a bit of work. Some items need assembly, others reheating, and the turkey is brined and ready to go in your oven.

This dinner quickly sold-out last year, so be sure to book as soon as possible. You can pick up your Sea Creatures Thanksgiving Dinner Kit at Willmott’s Ghost on Wednesday, November 24 from noon to 4pm. 2100 Sixth Ave., willmottsghost.com

Round pan filled with salted dinner rolls.

Daniel’s Broiler

Abandon your kitchen altogether this year and enjoy your Thanksgiving dinner with a side of Lake Union views at Daniel’s Broiler. From noon to 8pm, this SLU classic is serving up a four course Thanksgiving meal. Each meal begins with an autumn relish tray (think cured meats, marinated veggies, salmon spread and herb chèvre). Choose clam chowder or a classic Caesar salad for your starter, then pick from roast turkey, prime rib, maple pork roast, king salmon, or plant-based ravioli for your entrée. If you seek steak over those dishes, you can opt for a USDA Prime filet mignon (8 or 12 ounce) or the Daniel’s Delmonico for an extra treat yourself fee.

Wrap up the decadence with pumpkin pie, New York-style cheesecake, or a double scoop of Olympic Mountain ice cream or sorbet. 809 Fairview Place N., schwartzbros.com/locations/daniels-broiler-lake-union

Story by Ethan Chung & photographs courtesy of Sea Creatures & Whole Foods Market.


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