June 20

Creative Connections

Part art, part craft, part collaboration—JOIN has a brick-and-mortar spot at 400 Fairview featuring makers from the Pacific Northwest and beyond.

The swath of cityscape between downtown and Lake Union is a hotbed of development, from the latest fast-casual restaurants to shiny new buildings and bustling tech campuses. But Seattle still holds tight to its artsy, creative roots. Enter JOIN Shop, a light-filled space that’s more than just another store in South Lake Union—it’s also a home for art, workshops, home goods, and, above all, community.

Started in 2008 as JOIN Design, this collective of independent designers and artists has become a full-fledged maker space and shop nestled inside The Hall of 400 Fairview (400fairview.com/the-hall). It features the works of more than 60 U.S. makers, including various housewares, stationery, jewelry, and gifts for any design-minded individual.

JOIN is owned and operated by Sallyann Corn and Joe Kent of the Seattle-based studio Fruitsuper. Their own goods, such as minimalist brass trivets and clever match holders, are on offer. But the shopkeepers’ ultimate mission goes beyond just selling beautiful things, Corn says. “We’re connecting customers with the makers of objects that lovingly fill their homes.”

The co-owners prioritize knowing each artist in their ever-growing collective (the roster spans the country), forging a bond that’s more than just transactional. JOIN doubles as a humble gathering space. Shoppers can tuck into the boutique to meet makers like author and wood artisan Melanie Abrantes, who came in from San Francisco to teach a wooden spoon–carving workshop in the space. It’s this collaborative spirit that sets JOIN apart. It’s a shop, to be sure, but also a place for creatives to connect with each other and with the folks taking their art home—perhaps even a freshly whittled serving spoon.

JOIN Shop, 400 Fairview Ave N, Ste 102; Tue–Sat, 11am–6pm; join-design.com

Story by Rosin Saez and Photography by Daniel Berman.

Denny Park

Seattle’s first park — and former graveyard