South Lake Union
Events Calendar

November 24 Events

November 24 - December 23, South Lake Union

Christmas Ship Festival 2017

The Argosy Cruises Christmas Ship Festival is a ship-to-shore holiday celebration that has been a Northwest tradition since 1949. The Spirit of Seattle, the Official Christmas Ship is decorated with hundreds of shimmery white lights and sails to different Puget Sound waterfront communities – around 65 in all. Choirs on board the Christmas Ship perform to guests aboard as well as to our Follow Boats and to those communities gathered on shore. Select your preferred way to experience the Christmas Ship and prepare for the holiday event of the season!

There are three unique ways to experience Christmas Ship:  Lead Boat Experience – Join us aboard the official Christmas Ship, the Spirit of Seattle, as she sails to various Puget Sound waterfront communities. Guests are accompanied by Santa Claus and a live on board choir. 2-3hr cruise aboard the Christmas Ship Choir on board the 2nd deck Boarding photos with Santa and an on board reading of ‘Twas the Night Before Christmas’ Kids holiday craft area & activities Follow Boat Experience – On a fully decorated Follow Boat, you’ll enjoy views of the Christmas Ship and follow her to each performance site to hear the choir performances broadcast from the Lead Boat. 2-3hr cruise following the Christmas Ship Broadcast choir performance from Lead Boat Boarding photos and Santa* on board Kids holiday craft bags Shore Experience – Welcome the Christmas Ship and Follow Boats from a community event on shore and enjoy a 20-minute choir performance, broadcast from the Christmas Ship. This unique way to experience the Christmas Ship Festival is not to be missed!

Up close views of the Christmas Ship boats and Follow Boats

Live choir performance broadcast from aboard the Christmas Ship

Argosy Cruises is proud to donate a portion of all Christmas Ship Festival proceeds to The Seattle Times Fund for the Needy, an annual program that raises money for several local charitable organizations in the Puget Sound area, allowing them to continue to provide valuable programs and services.

For more information: https://www.argosycruises.com/argosy-cruises/christmas-ship-festival/

November 15 - January 10, Winston Wachter

Amanda Manitach, Dirty

Winston Wächter Fine Art Seattle is proud to announce an exhibition of new drawings by Amanda Manitach, Dirty. Please join us for our opening reception on Wednesday, November 15, 6-8PM . The artist will be in attendance.

Amanda Manitach’s latest body of work, Dirty, continues to document her intimate thoughts visually and physically. Her works are drawn and rubbed into elegant contrasts of delicate pattern and block print honesty. In turn these drawings stain her hands and arms, creating a temporary record of each expression. The physicality of the process becomes a type of therapeutic diary. These thoughts expose her humor, strength, vulnerably and twisted optimism.

“I see my work as a task of both consciously and subliminally sorting out the experience of a female trying to make expressive marks—a task that has found uncanny resonance for me with the history of female hysteria. I am fascinated by history, art, the politics surrounding the female body, and by art that borders on obsessive, meditative devotion.”
Manitach’s work has been exhibited at the Frye Art Museum, Bellevue Arts Museum and Tacoma Art Museum. From 2012-2015 she served as curator of Hedreen Gallery at Seattle University. She co-founded and co-directed multiple mixed-use arts spaces in Seattle’s Capitol Hill neighborhood, including TMRW Party and The Factory.

November 15 - January 10, Winston Wachter

DIRK STASCHKE: Perfection of Happenstance

Winston Wächter Fine Art Seattle is proud to announce an exhibition of new sculptures by Dirk Staschke, Perfection of Happenstance. Please join us for our opening reception on Wednesday, November 15, 6-8PM . The artist will be in attendance.

With Perfection of Happenstance, Dirk Staschke continues his exploration of Dutch Vanitas paintings and their powerful symbolism of impermanence and inevitable decay. In this body of work Staschke focuses on the fleeting illusion of space created by painting and the static moments they aim to represent. Staschke’s freestanding sculptures forwardly present lifelike bouquets built on the raw foundations of visibly manipulated clay. Perspective dictates if you are given view of the process or the “finished” work. The acknowledgement of all aspects of creation and the false impressions those can create is a vital element in all of Stachke’s work.

In his recent series of wall mounted “paintings” Staschke has created imagery deteriorating before you. The compositions appear as if they are sliding off the panel, leaving just the impression of what was once painstakingly painted to capture a moment in time. Staschke again plays with what we think we know, by using carefully layered glazes intended to create artificial instability. What seems to be a failing of the medium is in fact an extremely involved process, highly difficult to execute. Every element of the artwork has been sculpted and painted, asking us to question the validity of those mediums and how they have been valued throughout time.

His work has been included in the collections at The Birmingham Museum of Art, The Smithsonian, The International Museum of Ceramic Art, The Portland Art museum, The American Museum of Ceramic Art, among others.

November 18 - June 17, Museum of History and Industry

Seattle on the Spot: The Photographs of Al Smith

Seattle on the Spot: The Photographs of Al Smith at MOHAI Nov. 18, 2017- June 17, 2018, is an ambitious exhibition that chronicles the African-American community in the Pacific Northwest. The exhibit also provides an entry point into national discussions about the history and changing character of Seattle and its evolving neighborhoods.

Legendary photographer Al Smith was an explorer and his camera was the universal key that opened doors and gave him license to go anywhere. Seattle on the Spot: The Photographs of Al Smith, organized by Seattle’s Museum of History & Industry (MOHAI) and on view Nov 18, 2017 – June 17, 2018, gives visitors a rare peek into Smith’s historically significant collection that chronicles the African-American community during the mid-20th century in the Pacific Northwest. The exhibit also provides an entry point into national discussions about the history and changing character of Seattle and its evolving neighborhoods.

Seattle on the Spot: The Photographs of Al Smith is a retrospective of Smith’s work. It honors the collection of more than 40,000 photographs generously donated to MOHAI by the Smith family.

Curated by Howard Giske, MOHAI’s Curator of Photography and a long-time friend of Al Smith, this important exhibit uncovers a collection as unique as the man who created it. ”It is one person’s work but it says a lot about Seattle and its people,” said Giske. “Al was as comfortable in church on Sunday morning as he was in a nightclub on Saturday night.”

For more than half a century, Smith documented the African-American community life in Seattle. During that time, he amassed thousands of prints and negatives (taken between 1940 and 2005), which he stashed in drawers and cabinets and grocery bags in his home.

“Al Smith’s photography chronicled his life as an active, vital member of Seattle’s African-American community,” said Leonard Garfield, MOHAI’s Executive Director. “With great warmth and intimacy he created thousands of remarkable photographs of life in the neighborhood where he was born and where he raised his family—the Central District. Smith’s brilliantly expressive documentary photography captures a community in transition, and subtly raises issues of social equity and inclusion; a topic of great significance today.”

As a teenager, Smith went to sea as a steward with the American President’s Line, sailing to Hawaii, Japan, China, and the Philippines. During his last trip to Asia in 1937, Smith bought a German-made Ikoflex camera and made up for lost time. He began to take his hobby seriously, although he modestly claimed in a 1992 interview that he was “doing nothing special, just shooting pictures…”

“Al wasn’t just somebody with a camera. He was a photographer. And that was his introduction,” said Jackie Lawson, Historian and founding member of the Black Heritage Society of Washington State.

MOHAI’s relationship with Smith goes back to 1986 when Smith volunteered in the MOHAI darkroom. For more than a decade, Smith helped the museum preserve its vintage-photo collection of Seattle history.

Seattle Times jazz writer and author of Jackson Street After Hours: The Roots of Jazz in Seattle Paul de Barros, describes Al Smith’s work as “extraordinary.” de Barros said, “When you look at Al’s photographs, you don’t feel like a visitor, but more like a participant, partaking in the joy revealed by his camera.”

Structured in a combination of six thematic sections, Seattle on the Spot takes visitors back in time.

An introduction/background of Al Smith is the first section and acquaints visitors to a humble, but driven photographer. This section provides an outline and background of Smith’s life.

From the introductory area, step into Smith’s Darkroom and explore his workspace—a captivating hands-on area where visitors can look at proof sheets, faux negatives viewable through a loop and a display of the cameras Smith used.

The next section is an immersive Nightclub. Here, visitors step into a theatrical nightclub-like atmosphere that breathes life into scenes of Seattle’s jazz scene of the 1940s immortalized by photos Smith took as a young man. This area includes a video, dance floor, music, interactives, games and artifacts on display.

Moving from the nightclub, visitors explore a more formal presentation of Smith’s work in the Nightclub Gallery section. Smith’s best-known work is from Seattle nightclubs in the Jackson Street district during the early 1940s capturing the musicians as well as reveling patrons, to whom he sometimes sold souvenir photographs. This was a heroic period for Seattle jazz—a wartime scene that ultimately spawned such internationally known artists as Ray Charles and Ernestine Anderson.

The final section focuses on the Retrospective Space. This section brings the discussion of Smith’s work to the present day and highlights the changes in the communities that Smith documented. Visitors will explore how communities are remembered today and have a chance to reflect and add information to Smith’s photos and stories to the oral history station.

“Al Smith just enjoyed people,” said Carol Peoples-Procter, President Black Heritage Society of Washington State. “I think he enjoyed life.  And he wanted to capture it through photos.”

Seattle on the Spot will be supported by unique programing including an exciting opportunity for a group of pre-selected high school students in the Central District to hone their photography skills, and develop personal aesthetic and narrative perspective. Students will curate their work for display in Seattle on the Spot from April – June 2018. Pieces will be on display in the exhibit and posted to MOHAI’s website.

MOHAI has gathered the city’s most influential leaders including former Seattle Mayor Norm Rice, Carol Peoples-Proctor, Jazmyn Scott and Al “Butch” Smith Jr. to advise and collaborate on program development for this unique and ambitious exhibition.

Seattle on the Spot: The Photographs of Al Smith is accompanied by an illustrated catalog with contributions by Jacqueline E. A. Lawson, Howard Giske, Al “Butch” Smith Jr., Paul de Barros and Quin’Nita Cobbins. The catalog is co-published by the Museum of History & Industry and the University of Washington Press.

Generous support for Seattle on the Spot: The Photographs of Al Smith is provided by National Endowment for the Arts, The Boeing Company, Laird Norton Wealth Management, MOHAI Exhibits Fund, Mike Repass, 4Culture, Hugh and Jane Ferguson Foundation, ArtsFund, and Gordon & Celia Bowker.

Instagram

Giving Season: Giving becomes more crucial as the days grow shorter & the NW rain freezes to flakes. This holiday season, connect with organizations in SLU to bring light & warmth to those in need. >>link to bio
Pet City: MOHAI’s new exhibit, It’s Raining Cats and Dogs, highlights Seattle’s history with four-legged friends. >>link in bio
Farestart’s Newest Digs: The Seattle institution is cooking up more goodness with three now-open concepts in SLU and an advanced apprenticeship program. >>link to bio

1,000

dogs to pet on any given day